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Zinbryta

Zinbryta is an antibody therapy that binds onto a receptor (interleukin-2) on the surface of T immune cells.  The SELECT trial studied 621 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients randomized to placebo and Zinbryta 150 mg [daclizumab high-yield process (HYP)] injected under skin every 4 weeks for 1 year.  Relapses were reduced 54% for patients on Zinbryta compared to placebo. Zinbryta treatment was associated with 57% less disability progression compared to placebo.

In the DECIDE study of 1841 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, Zinbryta under skin every 4 weeks was directly compared to Avonex weekly injections into muscle over 96 to 144 weeks of treatment.  Patients on Zinbryta had 45% less relapses than Avonex.  Less MRI activity was seen in people treated with Zinbryta (54% reduction on new or newly enlarging T2 lesions and 60% reduction on contrast-enhancing lesions).

Zinbryta can cause severe liver injury including liver failure and autoimmune hepatitis.  Liver blood tests are required monthly and up to 6 months after last dose. Other immune-mediated disorders can occur including skin reactions, enlarge lymph nodes, and colon inflammation (colitis). These conditions may require treatment with steroids or immunosuppressive medication.

Most common side effects from Zinbryta (compared to Avonex) included upper respiratory infections, rash (37% of patients) and enlarged lymph nodes. Before starting Zinbryta, testing should be performed for viral hepatitis B and C as well as tuberculosis.